Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×

The Police Tour Collars Sennheiser

New York (April 14, 2008)--To paraphrase Mel Brooks, it's good to be The Police. According to Billboard, the band's 30th Anniversary (and reputedly last) tour has played to more than 1.8 million people worldwide, grossing in excess of $212 million as of last November. Seeing as they're running right through August this year, it's safe to say Sting and the guys won't be busking for change anytime soon. With them through every show has been a phalanx of Sennheiser gear.

“Dude, I can’t believe you scalped tickets for these crummy seats; I can’t even see their Sennheiser mics from here.”New York (April 14, 2008)–To paraphrase Mel Brooks, it’s good to be The Police. According to Billboard, the band’s 30th Anniversary (and reputedly last) tour has played to more than 1.8 million people worldwide, grossing in excess of $212 million as of last November. Seeing as they’re running right through August this year, it’s safe to say Sting and the guys won’t be busking for change anytime soon. With them through every show has been a phalanx of Sennheiser gear.

The band has been using Sennheiser vocal microphones, wireless guitar systems, and G2 wireless personal monitors. Sting began using the evolution e 865 wired vocal microphone on tour even before Sennheiser officially introduced it in 2001. For backing vocals, Andy Summers is using the same vocal mic, while drummer Stewart Copeland is using a Sennheiser HSP 2 headset microphone paired with an evolution wireless G2 bodypack. Although some consideration was given to using a standard vocal mic, Copeland and his engineering team decided on the Sennheiser headset as it allowed the drummer the freedom he required during the show along.

The Sennheiser SK 500 G2 instrument transmitters on Sting’s bass and Andy Summers’ guitar send riffs to EM 550 G2 twin receivers. On Copeland’s hard-wired drum kit, Neumann KM 184 small-diaphragm condensers are positioned at overhead locations on cymbals and various percussion instruments, such as bells, as well as on the snare bottom. Sennheiser MD 421s pick up the tympani.

Monitor engineer Ian Newton commented, “The Sennheiser evolution wireless ew 300 IEM G2 personal monitors have provided a faultless performance throughout the tour. I’m using the Clair Bros helical antenna with the Sennheiser AC 2 antenna combiner for them.” Although the band relies mainly on ear monitors and would be able to perform with them alone, Newton complements them with stage wedges and a ButtKicker on Copeland’s drum stool to raise the on-stage SPLs so that the music not only sounds right to the band but feels right as well. Ian also added “the support we receive worldwide from Sennheiser has been first class and is a very important part of working with the products.”

Sennheiser USA
www.sennheiserusa.com

Close