Tom Pfaeffle Murder Defendant On The Run

By Clive Young. Seattle, WA (September 17, 2009)--Kino Michael Gomez, 57, who was charged with the July 17 murder of studio/live sound engineer Tom Pfaeffle, 49, in Twisp, WA, has fled; his whereabouts are unknown and he is considered armed and dangerous. A warrant has been issued for his arrest.
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Tom Pfaeffle
By Clive Young.

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Seattle, WA (September 17, 2009)--Kino Michael Gomez, 57, who was charged with the July 17 murder of studio/live sound engineer Tom Pfaeffle, 49, in Twisp, WA, has fled; his whereabouts are unknown and he is considered armed and dangerous. A warrant has been issued for his arrest.

Gomez left a goodbye note for his family stating, "By the time you read this letter, I will be gone. I have taken a one-way trip to the mountains. It is where I belong." The letter goes on to note "...society has already condemned me. The media, the bloggers, the police, the justice system, none of whom witnessed the alleged crime, already hung me. Hell, the justice system has even likened my 'crime' to that of Charles Manson's, for crying out loud! Well, just for spite, I shall deprive society of the circus it so bloody craves - the bearded lady quit!"

Pfaeffle, a veteran studio and live sound engineer who had worked with Nirvana, the Black Crowes, Queensryche, Alice Cooper, Aerosmith, BB King and others, was on vacation with his wife when he apparently tried to put his key in the wrong room door at the Blue Spruce Motel in Twisp. Inside the room, Gomez, who according to police reports was asleep wearing a belly band holster with two .40 caliber Glock 27 handguns on him (in addition to a Rock River AR-15 assault rifle that was also in the room), thought someone was trying to break in and fired twice.

Gomez was hit with first- and second-degree murder charges, as well as two counts of reckless endangerment, since Pfaeffle's wife was with him at the time of the murder. After a month in jail, Gomez made bail at $100,000, though prosecutors tried to have it set at $500,000. His letter apologizes to his family for "the financial burden I cannot possibly repay," and notes that he is carrying weapons: "Let no one get in my way -- I will not be very kind. Despair has now changed to anger."

Kino Michael Gomez's letter (courtesy Wenatchee World)

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