Tonic Composer Takes On Broadway Grand Central Station

New York City (November 7, 2003)--Tonic's Peter Fish recently took on projects far removed from the world of commercial production; projects that reflect his eclectic interests and talents. Besides composing music for Panasonic's new HDTV spot, "VaVaVoom," via Grey Advertising, Fish is now making noise on other Manhattan thoroughfares, including Broadway and Grand Central Station.
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New York City (November 7, 2003)--Tonic's Peter Fish recently took on projects far removed from the world of commercial production; projects that reflect his eclectic interests and talents. Besides composing music for Panasonic's new HDTV spot, "VaVaVoom," via Grey Advertising, Fish is now making noise on other Manhattan thoroughfares, including Broadway and Grand Central Station.

Frequently a friend and collaborator to giants of pop music, Fish is lending his expertise to Taboo, a Broadway musical written by Boy George that opens October 24th at the Plymouth Theater in New York City. The show, which ran in London's West End for two years, focuses on two men--Leigh Bowery and George O'Dowd--and tells of the gay underground scene in that town in the 1980s.

Fish handled the intricate task of programming the sounds for the synthesizer players in the show's orchestra. The job demanded Fish catalogue the sounds in the chronological sequence the musicians would need them during performance. "The show is great, and the songs are amazing," says Fish. "Boy George is just a remarkable writer."

Not far from Broadway stands another famous New York locale where one can hear Peter Fish's work: Grand Central Station. For the fifth time in six years, he's arranging and recording seasonal music for the Grand Central Station Christmas laser show, which is projected onto the roof of the terminal every 15 minutes from Thanksgiving to New Year's.

"It's a synthesized orchestration of almost the entire 'Nutcracker' suite," explains Fish. "It's a delicate process from an audio standpoint. It's such a big space, you can't use much low-frequency instrumentation, because the standing waves just roll on and on." The music will be heard through small BOSE speakers positioned above every entry of the terminal.

Tonic
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