Tonic Composes Mixes and Sound Designs Panasonic Spot

New York, NY (December 3, 2003)--Peter Fish of Tonic has composed the music to "Va Va Voom," a national spot for Panasonic's new high-definition television, via Grey Advertising. The current spot, which broke in October and continues to air, bears Tonic's influence throughout the production: In addition to the Fish score, the sound design was executed by Jun Mizumachi, and Jody Nazzarro handled the audio mix.
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New York, NY (December 3, 2003)--Peter Fish of Tonic has composed the music to "Va Va Voom," a national spot for Panasonic's new high-definition television, via Grey Advertising. The current spot, which broke in October and continues to air, bears Tonic's influence throughout the production: In addition to the Fish score, the sound design was executed by Jun Mizumachi, and Jody Nazzarro handled the audio mix.

In "Va Va Voom," a spokesman introduces a Panasonic plasma HD television, which floats against a gray background. After a few serene moments, the music swells, and the television spins its way through different camera angles, showing off crisp images of a football game, a blossoming flower and a jet skier whose wake splashes off the screen. Actor Christian Slater as voiceover describes the attributes of the television.

Fish's composition sets a suspenseful stage with a minor-key piano melody that begins sparsely then locks into an assertive rhythm. The piece almost sounds classical--almost. "It's an upscale product, so I definitely wanted to create a mood of sophistication for a 30-and-older audience," Fish explains. "But the client didn't want classical music, so I devised a melody with a classical sensibility but recorded it with more modern instrumentation and production."

Aside from Fish's music, the spot is propelled by the expert sound design of Jun Mizumachi. Every televised image and movement of the television comes to life with the appropriate sound. "This is a very high-end product, so the sound of the images on the television had to be rich and dynamic," reflects Mizumachi. "It had to sound contemporary, even futuristic."

Tonic
www.tonic.tv