WBGO Adds Quintessential Sennheiser Shotgun Mics

Newark, NJ (March 31, 2005)--WBGO, Jazz 88.3 FM and online at www.wbgo.org, broadcasting from Newark, NJ, recently acquired a pair each of Sennheiser's MKH60 super-cardioid/lobar short shotgun, MKH50 super-cardioid and MKH40 cardioid microphones. Unusually, in this age of automated radio playout, NPR cultural affiliate WBGO produces a large number of live music shows for broadcast each year, principally from venues in the New York metropolitan area.
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Newark, NJ (March 31, 2005)--WBGO, Jazz 88.3 FM and online at www.wbgo.org, broadcasting from Newark, NJ, recently acquired a pair each of Sennheiser's MKH60 super-cardioid/lobar short shotgun, MKH50 super-cardioid and MKH40 cardioid microphones. Unusually, in this age of automated radio playout, NPR cultural affiliate WBGO produces a large number of live music shows for broadcast each year, principally from venues in the New York metropolitan area.

A confluence of events led to WBGO purchasing the half-dozen Sennheiser microphones, according to the station's operations director of the past three years, Brian McCabe. In October of last year, he began, WBGO broadcast the opening night of Jazz at Lincoln Center in conjunction with NPR. "NPR brought MKH40s for the voice work for the hosts. I was impressed, as was my staff, by the sound of the MKH40s and how good they sounded for voice work."

He continued, "They were incredibly warm for such a small diaphragm mic. They were a tight enough pattern to keep out the excess noise from the ambience, but a wide enough pattern that the announcers could move around without too much of a proximity effect."

As McCabe pointed out, "We do jazz. And Sennheiser microphones lend themselves to acoustically produced music. We're rarely miking an amplifier. We're miking an instrument. And just about 95 percent of our gigs include a piano."

On occasion, WBGO has rented Sennheiser microphones. "But, adding-up the rental costs, it became apparent that for the outlay," he said, "we might as well get our own mics. So I went ahead and bought six, two of each model. The MKH40s we have used for voice work, and as overheads on a drum kit as well. We use the MKH50s principally on the piano. The 60s are mainly ambience mics."

Sennheiser Electronic Corporation
www.sennheiserusa.com