Winfield Rocks With Dangerous Gear - ProSoundNetwork.com

Winfield Rocks With Dangerous Gear

Edmeston, NY (September 8, 2008)--Producer/engineer Sterling Winfield is known in the hard rock music world for his heavy sounds, and for the past several years, he has been exclusively mixing through the Dangerous Music 2-Bus analog summing system at Gary Long's Nomad Studios in Carrollton, TX.
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Producer/engineer Sterling Winfield with the Dangerous Music 2-Bus analog summing system at Gary Long's Nomad Studios in Carrollton, TX. Edmeston, NY (September 8, 2008)--Producer/engineer Sterling Winfield is known in the hard rock music world for his heavy sounds, and for the past several years, he has been exclusively mixing through the Dangerous Music 2-Bus analog summing system at Gary Long's Nomad Studios in Carrollton, TX.

Winfield says, "I've been spoiled. I've worked with the Dangerous 2-Bus summing amp at Nomad Studios and I didn't want to do any mixing or critical listening without that technology at my side. The [Dangerous] D-Box is absolutely perfect for what I'm going to be doing at home. I also wanted to be fully compatible with Nomad."

Winfield works regularly at the Texas studio, which along with the Dangerous 2-Bus also utilizes the Dangerous Monitor and Dangerous MQ products in its hybrid analog and digital environment. "I'm a 'best of both worlds' kind of guy and that's why I like the Dangerous gear," he says. "It's compatible with all the digital stuff, but it's an analog system. That's what I love about it.

"My first experience with Dangerous gear was the 2-Bus at Nomad. I had pretty much mixed a project already and Gary [Long] asked me if I was finished and I said yeah but that it wasn't mastered yet. He said 'Do yourself a favor and get back into the mixes,' and he gave me the lowdown on the concept of the 2-Bus. I said 'That sounds pretty interesting,' and he said, 'you won't be sorry.' And sure enough, when I started monitoring the mixes through the 2-Bus, I could hear the difference immediately in clarity and how everything opened up. I heard the difference and had to have it. I told him he was right, and don't ever sell that thing. And to this day, I use the 2-Bus on everything that I work on there.

"In heavy metal and hard rock music, it's not always just a wall of sound--a lot of people don't understand that there's a lot of intricacies to that style of music as well. And that's where the Dangerous gear helps; it really retains the low end in the mix, and that's essential when you are trying to add depth. When you only mix in digital, sometimes it can have this two-dimensional sound--'Here's your left, here's your right'--that's it. When you add something that has an analog presence to it like the 2-Bus, then you're adding the depth to it as well--bigger, warmer, the front-to-back dimension. That's what I hear--you get a rounder, fuller picture of the sound. The Dangerous stuff just couldn't be better for doing something like that. It's made for guys like me that sometimes, because of time constraints or what the client's up against, have to mix inside the box, but Dangerous takes it outside the box. It gives you the quality to keep up with things that are going on in the music world today."

Winfield has just finished mixing Legacy of Disorder, a hard rock outfit from New Zealand, using the Dangerous Music 2-Bus. Coming up is a project mixing with ex-Pantera and Hellyeah drummer Vinnie Paul, and Seventh Void, featuring members of Type O Negative.

Nomad Recording Studio
www.nomadrecording.com

Dangerous Music
www.dangerousmusic.com