A-T Captures Puppy

Brooklyn-based instrumental fusion band Snarky Puppy make extensive use of Audio-Technica microphones during the recording process.
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Brooklyn, NY (October 1, 2014)—Brooklyn-based instrumental fusion band Snarky Puppy make extensive use of Audio-Technica microphones during the recording process.

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Since joining with the Snarky Puppy crew around 2007, engineer/mixer Eric Hartman has been behind the console for several albums from the ensemble, including We Like It Here, which the band released this year. “We record live with no overdubs,” states Hartman. “

The band records two sets per night for several days, in front of a live audience. Hartman explained, “They will play a set down, like it’s a concert, and after the four days, we may have several cuts to choose from, so [band leader] Michael League [can] figure out which ones he likes best based on the performance and the video quality, and proceed to the mixing stage from there. No overdubs, and close to no editing... We break a lot of rules, and many times, I think the records are better because of it.”

Hartman’s arsenal of A-T tools includes ATM450 cardioid condenser instrument; ATM350 cardioid condenser clip-on; ATM250 hypercardioid dynamic instrument; ATM650 hypercardioid dynamic instrument; AT4050 multi-pattern condenser; AT4060 cardioid condenser tube; AE3000 cardioid condenser instrument; AE4100 cardioid dynamic handheld; AE5100 cardioid condenser instrument; AE2500 dual-element cardioid instrument; AT4051b cardioid condenser; and AT4080 phantom-powered bidirectional ribbon microphones.

Hartman has put the mics to use in dozens of configurations, but a few favorites include using the ATM450 for snare and hi-hat (“It’s really good at taking a ‘snapshot’ of an area,” he remarks); ATM350s as clip-ons throughout the ensemble; AT4051bs as drum overheads; AE2500 on kick drum; AT4080 on guitar cabinets and certain horn solos; AE3000 on toms; and ATM250s on deep snares, organ bottom, and a variety of other uses.

Since the sessions are almost always filmed and end up on YouTube or as video releases, they must be visually pleasing, so the band also uses ATs ATH-M50RD professional studio monitor headphones. Hartman recalls, “They are bright red, and they really popped on camera, adding a very cool aesthetic.”

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