Acoustics First Gets Visual at ASA - ProSoundNetwork.com

Acoustics First Gets Visual at ASA

At the recent Fifth Joint Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and Acoustical Society of Japan, held earlier this month in Honolulu, Ron Sauro of NWAA Labs of Elma, WA presented "Diffusion: Better Ways of Measuring It, Displaying the Data, and Using It in Room Simulations." The presentation provided an opportunity to visually observe sound, sharing recent advances in how sound can be measured, displayed and simulated.
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Honolulu, HI (December 15, 2016)—At the recent Fifth Joint Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and Acoustical Society of Japan, held earlier this month in Honolulu, Ron Sauro of NWAA Labs of Elma, WA presented "Diffusion: Better Ways of Measuring It, Displaying the Data, and Using It in Room Simulations." The presentation provided an opportunity to visually observe sound, sharing recent advances in how sound can be measured, displayed and simulated.

The simulations, created by Jim DeGrandis at Acoustics First Corporation, modeled different surfaces under test, and also examined the development of sound fields in untreated spaces versus spaces treated with sound diffusers.

For those interested, Acoustics First has now posted these simulations online at https://acousticsfirst.info/2016/11/18/acoustics-first-makes-sound-visible/ .

Jim DeGrandis presented early Acoustics First particle simulation work at the ASA in Spring 2015, and has since expanded the work to include virtual design development, modeling of different treatment scenarios, and displaying real-world test data.

The ASA program’s summary of Sauro’s presentation offered,

“This paper will present and discuss diffusion and the many problems with trying to measure it, displaying the data and using this data in ways that allow us to better predict room responses. We will quickly discuss prior standards, their strengths and weaknesses and how a new proposed ASTM standard will correct those weaknesses. We will show that methods used in other areas of acoustics and electro-acoustics can be used to measure diffusion and display it in ways that allow directivity, magnitude, and phase to be displayed. These data sets can then be used in simulation programs, such as EASE. Odeon and CATT Acoustics, to better predict room responses for use in the design of rooms. We will present examples of those uses and the advantages in these proposals.

Acoustics First
http://www.acousticsfirst.com/