At AES: It’s All About Networking

Creation and collaboration through more comprehensive networks—ones both figurative and literal—push our industry’s evolution and growth. Collaborative tools and features are increasingly emphasized in new product announcements from the biggest names in pro audio technology—such as Avid’s Everywhere initiative, abounding AoIP products, etc. Yet it’s our own interpersonal networks that encourage measurable growth as well as affirming, feel-good outreach and educational opportunities.
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Some of the thousands of audio professionals who turned out for yesterday's opening day of AES in New York City.
Creation and collaboration through more comprehensive networks—ones both figurative and literal—push our industry’s evolution and growth. Collaborative tools and features are increasingly emphasized in new product announcements from the biggest names in pro audio technology—such as Avid’s Everywhere initiative, abounding AoIP products, etc. Yet it’s our own interpersonal networks that encourage measurable growth as well as affirming, feel-good outreach and educational opportunities.

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AES President-Elect John Krivit encourages Convention attendees to view this 139th gathering, first and foremost, as a chance to create career-affirming connections and/or influential mentoring moments.

“Audio engineers, regardless of age must keep up with the moving target that characterizes our industry’s technology,” Krivit details. “There’s really no better place for that than at an AES Convention. [Yet] what really blows the minds of students who find the opportunity to attend and take part in the technical program is the easy way that noted engineers, producers, designers and academics are available to talk and make a connection with. My advice is to not be shy, but don’t do all the talking about yourself. Ask a lot of good questions based on your research and, for students specifically, take the opportunity to invite some of the professionals that you respect to your campus to speak. As long as you are at the AES Convention, they’ll know that you are for real and that you’re on your way.”

Outgoing AES President Andres Mayo offers the Loudness Streaming Recommendations Technical Document—comprised through member/leaders Bob Katz and David Bialik—as an example of what happens when such pros connect with solutions to problems as a goal. “The [document] truly is an initiative that, if adopted by others as expected, will build new bridges between us mastering engineers, the producers, the musicians and the big players in the streaming industry,” reasons Mayo. “The fact that we can think together how to achieve a common goal (i.e., not destroying music quality because of excessive audio compression) is one of the most relevant forms of collaboration these days.”