Bishop Rewarded by Royer Labs

Royer Labs microphones contributed to two major accomplishments by recording engineer and producer Michael Bishop this year.
Author:
Publish date:

Cleveland, OH (August 3, 2015)—Royer Labs microphones contributed to two major accomplishments by recording engineer and producer Michael Bishop this year.

Image placeholder title

At February’s 57th Annual Grammy Awards, Bishop won his tenth Grammy in the category Best Engineered Album, Classical for his engineering, mixing, and mastering work on the ASO Media release Vaughan Williams: Dona nobis pacem, Symphony No. 4, The Lark Ascending, which features Robert Spano, Norman Mackenzie, and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus.

Shortly after, on March 4, he could be found in Dallas, TX engineering the Cancer Blows benefit concert recording for PBS at the Morton F. Meyerson Symphony Center. In each case, the microphones involved were drawn from the catalog of Burbank, CA-based Royer Labs.

Presently, Bishop’s Royer Labs microphone arsenal includes an SF-24 stereo active ribbon microphone, four SF-2 mono ribbon microphones, an SF-12 stereo ribbon mic, an R-122V vacuum tube ribbon mic, four R-121 mono ribbon mics, and four R-101 mono ribbon microphones. “For the Vaughn Williams project with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, I used the Royer SF-24 as the main surround pickup of the orchestra and four SF-2s on the chorus,” Bishop explained.”

“For the Cancer Blows project,” he continued, “I deployed an SF-24 as the main orchestra surround pickup while the SF-12 was used for the orchestra’s wind section as well as the overall big band pickup. I used the SF-2 for drum kit, the orchestra bass section, as well as the upright bass of the rhythm section. The R-122V was used as the primary downstage solo microphone while the R-121s were used as additional downstage solo mics and for the big band trumpet section. I also used the R-101 on the big band trumpet section.”

Royer Labs
www.royerlabs.com