Case Makes the Case for AES

Having devoted his professional career to the studies of aesthetics, perception, signal processing, electro-acoustics and room acoustics as part of recorded music, incoming AES President Alex Case is an Associate Professor of Sound Recording Technology at the University of Massachusetts Lowell where his students gain from these passions. Keeping pace with Society evolution, Case is dedicated to expanding boundaries and encouraging new possibilities.
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New York, NY (October 14, 2016)—Having devoted his professional career to the studies of aesthetics, perception, signal processing, electro-acoustics and room acoustics as part of recorded music, incoming AES President Alex Case is an Associate Professor of Sound Recording Technology at the University of Massachusetts Lowell where his students gain from these passions. Keeping pace with Society evolution, Case is dedicated to expanding boundaries and encouraging new possibilities.

"It may not be apparent from the outside, but AES has pushed itself out its comfort zones and stopped doing things just because 'that's the way we always do it," Case explains. "The leadership, staff and volunteers are innovating, getting creative and becoming even more entrepreneurial so that we can be agile enough to keep up with the constant change in our chosen field--I mean, audio! So much of the technology, workflow, distribution channel and creative output bear no resemblance today to what we were doing 10 years ago. With essential contributions of our active members (and that's you, right?) the Society keeps up."

As Case enters his new executive role, he focuses on two trends, which, as he explains, "began before my term, but hopefully [accelerate] in the coming years. First, AES is delivering more value for membership through year-round engagement. For some, AES 'The Society' is the same as AES 'The Convention.' That is a testament to the quality and scale and intensity of the conventions; here we are in L.A. doing it for the 141st time! But AES is so much more than the conventions.

“It is the amalgamation of all folks interested in audio, showcasing their work, advancing their careers and teaching each other as we audio folks are always eager to know more. We've gone live with a new web site, which will continue to evolve with ever-richer content and experiences. I see AES as a 24/7 cult of audio: local sections, regional events and online experiences. Membership in AES isn't just about status or discounted registration fees at conventions. It's a continuous experience of all things audio."

Case also notes that he will continue the Society's intentional effort to diversify all emerging disciplines that fit under the AES umbrella. "Audio is part of so many technical and creative fields," offers Case. "So I am eager to continue to bring AES expertise to broadcast, games, virtual reality, etcetera, through papers, tutorials, conferences and more."

This diversity of audio-centric experts and the resulting content is what makes the AES arguably the most important source of aural science data worldwide. "I like the following pair of contrasts, paralleled throughout the convention," Case reasons. "We've got cutting-edge AV/AR content in the sold-out conference next to, say, Jim Anderson's Tutorial on Podcasting. [The latter] tutorial is delivered by one of the first generation of engineers and producers at National Public Radio in Washington D.C. You get to learn elements of mixing and storytelling...from a master who was doing this at the highest-level decades ago. We learn from the past; we embrace the future."

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