CISAC Releases Global CCI Study

A global study of the cultural and creative industries (CCI) found that revenues exceed those of telecom services and that they employ more people than the car industry in Europe, Japan and the U.S.A. combined.
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Neuilly-sur-Seine, France (December 9, 2015)—A global study of the cultural and creative industries (CCI) found that revenues exceed those of telecom services and that they employ more people than the car industry in Europe, Japan and the U.S.A. combined.

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This major contribution of CCI to the global economy is explained in a new study, jointly presented recently by the International Confederation of Societies of Authors and Composers (CISAC) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) at UNESCO’s headquarters in Paris, France, and published by EY (formerly Ernst & Young).

The study concludes that, to unlock the full potential of CCI, creators must be fairly remunerated for the use of their creative works, so that they can continue contributing to culture and the economy. In particular, in the digital market, policymakers need to address the transfer of value currently taking place in favor of Internet intermediaries, and ensure that creators and the creative industries are paid fairly for the exploitation of their works.

In 2013, creative content contributed $200 billion to global digital sales, powering sales of digital devices and increasing demand for high-bandwidth telecom services. Sales of digital cultural goods generated $65 billion and $21.7 billion of advertising revenues for online media and free streaming websites.

The comprehensive study by EY, “Cultural Times – the First Global Map of Cultural and Creative Industries,” analyzes 11 CCI sectors—advertising, architecture, books, gaming, music, movie, newspapers and magazines, performing arts, radio, TV, visual arts—worldwide.

Each geographic region has its strengths:

Asia-Pacific: 34% of global CCI revenues, 40% of jobs with the largest consumer base and a fast rising middleclass; leader in gaming; growing fast in movies and books.

Europe: 32% of global CCI revenues, 25% of jobs cultural economy is rooted in history, underpinned by strong public support, a highly educated population and a strong concentration of creators.

North America: 28% of global CCI revenues, 15% of jobs; strong international influence and leader movies, TV and performing arts.

Latin America: 6% of global CCI revenues, 16% of jobs; TV is king; Latin American TV shows travel worldwide, as well as music and dance.

Africa and Middle East: 3% of global CCI revenues, 8% of jobs; opportunities in film production, TV and music; informal economy—for example, unofficial music performances—is a significant part of the cultural scene, and a reservoir of jobs.

Cultural Times – the First Global Map of Cultural and Creative Industries

www.worldcreative.org