DPA Welcomed To Jungle

Veteran Australian sound designer Craig Carter elected to use DPA microphones to capture the sounds of the world's great apes for a new documentary film.
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Alleroed, Denmark (October 16, 2012)-Veteran Australian sound designer Craig Carter elected to use DPA microphones to capture the sounds of the world's great apes for a new documentary film.

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Produced by Australian film company, Visionquest Entertainment, The Last of the Great Apes is a feature-length documentary that will be released in cinemas and supported by a six-part TV series. Conservationist Holly Carroll fronts the documentary.

"With this project, I took a drama approach to the audio recording by trying to capture 'edge of frame' dialogue and, wherever possible, taking a multi-track approach to FX/atmosphere recording," Carter comments. "My main microphone was the DPA 5100, but I also linked two Sound Devices 8-track recorders at times, which allowed me to include other microphones, such as a DPA 4017B, in the set-up as well."

Carter, who has worked on over 70 feature films, as well as many television productions and independent and short films, said "Thanks to the DPA 5100's compact size and extreme portability, it was ideally suited to these very challenging conditions. Also, the DPA 5100 has only one multicore cable, which was an important consideration because I was mainly recording and booming on my own. Having lots of cables to worry about would have made the task way too difficult."

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