Ellefson Digs DAW

David Ellefson, perhaps best-known as the bassist for Megadeth, always has projects cooking on the side, but doesn’t have the built-out personal studio one might expect. "To be honest, I have been somewhat 'DAW-dumb,' mainly because I never invested a lot of money into an elaborate home studio," Ellefson observes. "I did it years ago but it seemed like by the time I got done with an 18-month world tour, everything I'd bought was completely obsolete."
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Phoenix, AZ (October 2, 2014)—David Ellefson, perhaps best-known as the bassist for Megadeth, always has projects cooking on the side, but doesn’t have the built-out personal studio one might expect. "To be honest, I have been somewhat 'DAW-dumb,' mainly because I never invested a lot of money into an elaborate home studio," Ellefson observes. "I did it years ago but it seemed like by the time I got done with an 18-month world tour, everything I'd bought was completely obsolete."

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Wanting a rough-and-ready set up, he went with PreSonus Studio One Professional. "I just like to sit down, write, and get ideas right into the computer with the least amount of effort possible,” he said. “I find that as soon as I start getting into the engineering mindset, my musical ideas are gone, and then I end up frustrated and walk away with nothing. So for me, the simpler the better."

It seems to have worked—Ellefson used Studio One to record the audio-book version of his autobiography, My Life with Deth: Discovering Meaning in a Life of Rock and Roll, and he also used it to provide narration for the documentary Battlefield of the Mind, which addresses homeless veterans and those with PTSD.

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