Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×

Larry Edgeworth, NBC News Audio Tech, Dies of COVID-19

Larry Edgeworth, a 25-year veteran of NBC News who worked out of the network’s Rockefeller Plaza headquarters in Manhattan, died on Thursday, March 19, from complications brought about by the coronavirus.

NBC audio technician Larry Edgeworth (far left) died March 19 due to COVID19.
NBC audio technician Larry Edgeworth (far left) died March 19 due to COVID-19. Instagram/Savannah Guthrie

New York, NY (March 23, 2020) — Larry Edgeworth, a 25-year veteran of NBC News who worked out of the network’s Rockefeller Plaza headquarters in Manhattan, died on Thursday, March 19, from complications brought about by the coronavirus.

“Larry had underlying health issues,” show host Katy Tur reported during MSNBC Live. “COVID-19 exploited those and stole him away from us way too soon.”

Edgeworth, who was 61, is survived by his wife, Crystal, and two sons.

Coronavirus and Pro Audio: Developing News

Throughout the day after the news broke NBC and MSNBC show hosts fondly remembered a colleague who was beloved and respected.

“While you may not have known him or his name, his work came into your home on a regular basis,” said Brian Williams, host of The Eleventh Hour with Brian Williams, who worked with Edgeworth in Afghanistan and the Middle East, also covering natural disasters such as Hurricane Katrina.

“He loved his work and was superb at it. And we loved him: cool as a cucumber, old school gracious, and warm and kind and tireless, in an exhausting and often dangerous business,” said Williams.

“He exemplified grace and professionalism and camaraderie. He was tough, funny, kind, downright courageous and cool under pressure. This loss of Larry Edgeworth is incredibly hard for all of us here,” said Chris Hayes, host of All in with Chris Hayes, who recalled first working with him in Ferguson, MO in 2014.

“The thing you should know about Larry Edgeworth is that he was a hoot,” said Rachel Maddow. “He was a ton of fun. And he was really good at his job.”

The host of The Rachel Maddow Show added, “It was always a really good sign if you got sent into the field or to a remote location somewhere and Larry was on the team. He was just super charismatic, super talented, very respected by his coworkers.”

“I adored Larry,” wrote Today co-anchor Savannah Guthrie on Instagram. “We traveled together for two straight months on a campaign in 2008 and he was always the most warm, most professional, most loving. All hours of the day and night, no matter how hungry or tired or stressed we were — he was always a joy.”

“In my eight years at MSNBC and NBC I think I worked with Larry more than any other crew guy,” said Tur. “When you’re living on the road, your coworkers become family. Larry was my family, my big brother.

“I wish I had a singular story to sum up how great he was. But all I can think of right now are the little details. The orange if I was hungry. The stiff arm if I was in trouble. The chair if we were on a stakeout. In 2016, camped outside of Trump Tower, those details were daily. And the chair was often a bunch of camera cases stacked on top of each other,” Tur recalled.

“Larry was gruff, but he was never stingy with a smile. He was a big bear of a man, with a big bear of a heart. And that might sound like a cliché but, coming from a girl with Bear as her middle name, there really is no higher compliment,” she said.

“The world he leaves behind is still full of sounds,” said Williams. “All that’s missing is a man who knew how to capture them all so well.”

Close