Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×

Mr. Rogers, Dr. Dre, Village People Added to National Recording Registry

What do Mr. Rogers and Dr. Dre have in common? Both were just inducted into the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress.

What do Mr. Rogers and Dr. Dre have in common? Both were just inducted into the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress.
What do Mr. Rogers and Dr. Dre have in common? Both were just inducted into the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress.

Washington, DC (March 25, 2020)—Cheap Trick at Budokan, the theme song from Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, the Village People’s “Y.M.C.A.” and the play-by-play of the 1951 National League tiebreaker between the New York Giants and the Brooklyn Dodgers are among the 25 recordings just added to the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress.

Released in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic, the 25 titles newly added to the registry are described by the Library of Congress as the “ultimate ‘stay at home’ playlist.” New inductees also include Dr. Dre’s debut studio album The Chronic, Selena’s 1990 album Ven Conmigo, Allan Sherman’s comedy 1963 classic “Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh,” Dusty Springfield’s 1969 album Dusty in Memphis, Whitney Houston’s rendition of Dolly Parton’s “I Will Always Love You” and Tina Turner’s 1984 album Private Dancer.

Recording Academy P&E Wing to Honor Dr. Dre

“The National Recording Registry is the evolving playlist of the American soundscape. It reflects moments in history captured through the voices and sounds of the time,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “We received over 800 nominations this year for culturally, historically or aesthetically significant recordings to add to the registry. As genres and formats continue to expand, the Library of Congress is committed to working with our many partners to preserve the sounds that have touched our hearts and shaped our culture.”

 National Recording Registry
National Recording Registry

Under the terms of the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000, the Librarian, with advice from the Library’s National Recording Preservation Board (NRPB), is tasked with annually selecting 25 titles that are “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and are at least 10 years old.

Some registry titles have already been preserved by the copyright holders, the artists or other archives. In cases where a selected title has not already been preserved, the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation works to ensure that the sound recording will be preserved by some entity and available for future generations. This can be either through the Library’s recorded-sound preservation program or through collaborative ventures with other archives, recording studios and independent producers.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States — and extensive materials from around the world — both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.

See the full list: https://www.loc.gov/item/prn-20-023/national-recording-registry-class-produces-ultimate-stay-at-home-playlist/2020-03-25/

Library of Congress: www.loc.gov

Close