Industry Leader Ham Brosious, Dead at 93

Pro audio industry entrepreneur Huston Hamilton (“Ham”) Cobb Brosious of Oxford, Connecticut, died May 25, 2017 after a brief illness. He was 93. A mainstay of the industry for decades, he was instrumental in the success of Scully recorders in the 1960s, before founding pro audio dealer Audiotechniques in the 1970s, which would be a major player in the Northeast recording and broadcast audio market for two decades.
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Oxford, CT (June 2, 2017)—Pro audio industry entrepreneur Huston Hamilton (“Ham”) Cobb Brosious of Oxford, Connecticut, died May 25, 2017 after a brief illness. He was 93. A mainstay of the industry for decades, he was instrumental in the success of Scully recorders in the 1960s, before founding pro audio dealer Audiotechniques in the 1970s, which would be a major player in the Northeast recording and broadcast audio market for two decades.

Born April 12, 1924, in Philadelphia, PA, he attended Pennsylvania State University, interrupting his studies to enlist during World War II, where he received a battlefield promotion to Captain and was part of the US occupation forces in Japan. Following the war, he returned to Penn State and graduated from the School of Journalism in 1949, with a B.A. in Advertising.

Following various media sales jobs around the country, Brosious entered the world of pro audio when he began selling an early broadcast automation system called International Good Music (IGM), eventually landing in New York in 1960 as IGM’s national sales manager. At the forefront of what was becoming the modern recording industry in the 1960s, he moved on to become vice president and general manager of Scully Recording Instruments in Bridgeport, CT where he was credited with commercialization of the first professional solid state magnetic tape recorder, the Scully 280.

In the 1970s, he co-founded Audiotechniques, Inc. of Stamford, CT and Manhattan as a professional audio equipment dealer. For two decades, Audiotechniques was a major player in the professional audio industry, naming most major recording studios and broadcast facilities within its market as customers. In the 1990s, he handled consulting gigs and ran studio liquidations at Hamilton Brosious Associates (HBA).

He was a lifelong member and past president of the Audio Engineering Society (AES); a member of Broadcast Pioneers; a supporter and organizer of the Society of Professional Recording Studios (SPARS); a member of the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), and the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE).

He is survived by his beloved partner Ann Krane, his children Barbara Lindsay, Matthew Brosious, and Sarah (Paul) Vaivoda, seven grandchildren, two great grandchildren, an extended family including Ann Krane’s children, their spouses, and her grandchildren. The family has asked that memorial donations be made to the Cyrenius H. Booth Library, Newtown, CT at http://www.chboothlibrary.org/support-the-library/