Sanken Captures Brassy Cancer Benefit

Grammy-winning engineer Michael Bishop recently used Sanken CO-100K microphones to capture the "Cancer Blows" Dallas benefit concert featured legendary trumpet players such as Doc Severinsen, Arturo Sandoval, Lee Loughnane (the band Chicago) and Canadian Brass alumni Ronnie Romm, Ryan Anthony, Jens Lindenmann and Joe Burgstaller, joined by members of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and the UNT One O'Clock Lab Band at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center.
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Dallas, TX (May 27, 2015)—Grammy-winning engineer Michael Bishop recently used Sanken CO-100K microphones to capture the "Cancer Blows" Dallas benefit concert featured legendary trumpet players such as Doc Severinsen, Arturo Sandoval, Lee Loughnane (the band Chicago) and Canadian Brass alumni Ronnie Romm, Ryan Anthony, Jens Lindenmann and Joe Burgstaller, joined by members of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and the UNT One O'Clock Lab Band at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center.

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"The common element in these historic projects was the Sanken CO-100Ks across the front of the orchestra," explained Bishop. "That is where the main part of the whole soundscape is captured. In the middle, there is a left-center-right setup with the 100Ks, and then two flanking microphones, and that has to be right first before anything else is added in."

Bishop continued, "Basically, we used the performance space as an extremely large recording studio. And we set up our control room in the music library. We brought in full acoustic treatment and monitored in 5.1 with an ATC SCM150 5.1 monitoring system. The conductor can come in and hear it the way that he just heard it out on stage, and it makes it very easy for us to work on the performances and the sound."

Bishop's Sanken CO-100K microphones are intended for recording music up to 100 kHz. "They are the perfect match for the formats in which I record," said Bishop. "It's Direct Stream Digital, which is sampled at rates up to 11.2 MHz, and has frequency response out beyond 100K, and a high resolution PCM recording, again with frequency response well out beyond the range of human hearing."

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