Scully Earns Broadcast Record

It’s official: Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully has earned a new Guinness World Records title for Longest career as a sports broadcaster for a single team at 65 years 5 months 22 days.
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New York, NY (September 25, 2015)—It’s official: Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully has earned a new Guinness World Records title for Longest career as a sports broadcaster for a single team at 65 years 5 months 22 days.

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Scully's record was certified in a special pre-game ceremony during his bobblehead night at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, September 23, before the Los Angeles Dodgers took on the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Scully is in his 66th year as a broadcaster for the Dodgers. His remarkable career with the team began on April 1, 1950, when they were known as the Brooklyn Dodgers and based out of New York. He later followed the team to Los Angeles at the beginning of the 1958 season.

To further cement his broadcasting credentials, Scully also holds the Guinness World Records title for Youngest sports broadcaster to broadcast a World Series game (baseball). On October 1, 1952, at the age of 25, he announced as the Dodgers beat the New York Yankees, 4-2 in game one of a seven-game series won by the Yankees.

Scully, whose vivid yet simplistic description of a baseball game has thrilled fans for years, has announced a number of record-breaking moments throughout his career. Scully called Johnny Podres' shutout of the Yankees in game seven of the 1955 World Series giving the Dodgers' their first World Championship; Hank Aaron's 715th career home run on April 8, 1974, which broke Babe Ruth's Major League Baseball record and both Don Drysdale's 58.2 scoreless innings streak in 1968 and Orel Hershiser's 59.0 scoreless innings streak in 1988.

Another of his broadcasting highlights includes calling the Dodgers' return to the Coliseum on March 29, 2008 in front of a Guinness World Records record-breaking crowd of 115,300. Scully, who was elected to baseball's Hall of Fame in 1982, has called three perfect games including Sandy Koufax's perfecto in 1965 and 20 no-hitters.

Guinness World Records
guinnessworldrecords.com