Smyles Records Films on the Move

With an array of Sound Devices equipment his inventory, Tony Smyles, a 30-year veteran of film, TV and commercials, recently worked on a week-long project for an upcoming one-character film tentatively titled How Not to Kill a Woman.
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Detroit, MI (October 16, 2015)—With an array of Sound Devices equipment his inventory, Tony Smyles, a 30-year veteran of film, TV and commercials, recently worked on a week-long project for an upcoming one-character film tentatively titled How Not to Kill a Woman.

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Smyles, whose arsenal includes two 664 field production mixers, a 633 compact mixer and a 788T audio recorder, worked solo to capture the audio, responsible for booming and fast-paced power takes on the project, which often flew through several pages of the script in a short amount of time. To stay on top of the action, he used the 633, along with the Schoeps SuperCMIT 2 U shotgun microphone.

“This was an intense five days,” adds Smyles. “It was a project unlike anything I have ever done before. The portability and the light weight of the 633 worked out really well.”

Smyles utilized the 633 and 664 mixers on the recent independent film, Broken Links. Featuring no more than five speaking parts at a time, the majority of the first week of filming took place in a house, mostly depicting the lead actress making several Skype calls. Many of these scenes featured this one-sided conversation with a lot of sound effects.

Smyles relied heavily on his 633, in a portable ENG-style rig, to capture both dialog and effects. When more cast members became part of the production, Smyles turned to his audio cart equipped with the 664.

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