SSL Live Hits Road With Lemoine

FOH engineer Kevin Lemoine has been around the world with acts like Green Day, Iggy Pop, Ice-T, Jane’s Addiction and others, almost always with an analog console in tow. Recently, he hit the road with the long-running Irish/American, punk/folk act Flogging Molly for the band’s annual Green 17 tour—a countdown of sorts to St. Patrick’s Day—and along for the ride was a new SSL Live console, supplied by VER Tour Sound.
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FOH engineer Kevin Lemoine recently took an SSL Live console on the road with Flogging Molly.
New York, NY (April 15, 2014)—FOH engineer Kevin Lemoine has been around the world with acts like Green Day, Iggy Pop, Ice-T, Jane’s Addiction and others, almost always with an analog console in tow. Recently, he hit the road with the long-running Irish/American, punk/folk act Flogging Molly for the band’s annual Green 17 tour—a countdown of sorts to St. Patrick’s Day—and along for the ride was a new SSL Live console, supplied by VER Tour Sound.

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Lemoine described the tour as “theaters and larger clubs, like the House of Blues, with loudspeakers ranging from a very nice d&b J-series outside where everything is pristine and clean, all the way down to 15-year-old EV boxes.”

VER’s Jason Vrobel has worked Green Day shows with Lemoine since 2004 as crew chief and system engineer. “I’ve known Kevin for a very long time,” Vrobel said. “He’s always been anti-digital. Always uses analog as much as he possibly can. Anytime there’s analogue/digital situation, it wasn’t his choice. This was the first time he was extremely happy.”

“I didn’t have any time on the SSL Live before we went out on tour,” said Lemoine. “Back at VER, Jason programmed the inputs, effects sends and returns, groups, basically assigning the whole console before the tour. So no training, a little bit of YouTube searching about how things work, how it was set up, how it operated, but the rest of it was hands-on right there. It’s not a very difficult console to get around on. The first day, was a little nerve-wracking because I was just learning the console. Second day, I got a little deeper into what was available on each input; compressors, limiters, gates and how things worked. For the stuff that you use every day, it’s laid out pretty well. The sound was great on the first day and throughout the tour, I just refined the great sound.

“It’s a very wide sound stage,” said Lemoine. “A lot of consoles don’t go that wide. It’s nice to hear your drummer’s toms go from left to right and hear a true stereo image on your cymbals. It’s definitely a wide sound stage. Bar none, it’s the best digital console on the market. I have no doubt in my mind. I really like Live’s mic pres, they’re pretty amazing.”

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