SSL Moves In At COTM

Church on the Move (COTM) has an appropriate name. Its main Tulsa campus, set on 300 acres, is home to several venues including the 2,500-capacity Main Auditorium and a 1,500 capacity space in the Oneighty building (youth ministry), both of which recently got SSL L500 live mixing consoles and a Live Remote Expander.
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Tulsa, OK (November 19, 2015)—Church on the Move (COTM) has an appropriate name. Its main Tulsa campus, set on 300 acres, is home to several venues including the 2,500-capacity Main Auditorium and a 1,500 capacity space in the Oneighty building (youth ministry), both of which recently got SSL L500 live mixing consoles and a Live Remote Expander.

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Andrew Stone has been the production manager at COTM for 11 years and a professional FOH Engineer for 25 years. When it came time to update the facilities’ systems, he auditioned a variety of digital live consoles. "The SSL sounded the best, plain and simple," he said. " It was the only console that I thought could exceed the beautiful analogue sound that I had been used to.... I now get fantastic, positive comments from people that normally don't pay attention to the sound… All they know is that they are sitting in the seat, listening, and it's giving them a different kind of experience."

COTM's live production workflow includes a simultaneous broadcast mix that is used for the Church's streamed output. "We have thousands of people listening to the stream every time we do a service; it's like another church out there,” said Stone. “That broadcast mix is created at FOH, and requires a specific solution. "We don’t have a separate broadcast facility that we're re-mixing in," said Stone. "For a church service, I might have music at 100 dB, but then I've got big parts of the event that are all spoken, and those will be closer to 70 dB. For a live broadcast mix, that's a big level disparity between segments; if you're streaming on your computer and the talking is 30dB lower than the music, you won't have enough volume available to hear it.”

Stone mixes the spoken section/MC microphones to a Stem—a type of sub-group unique to SSL Live consoles—while the band is mixed to a Master Bus. That and the MC Stem, are routed to one of the console’s four matrices. One set of Matrix outputs is used for the PA and one set is for the broadcast feed, with ‘MC’ contributions to the PA output set at -30dB, allowing Stone flexibility during a show. He can adjust the MC mix, as well as both band and MC contributions to the PA and broadcast feeds, with full processing.

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