Tracking RF Transgressions In London

The Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre in London is a very busy place, hosting more than 400 national and international events a year, ranging from conventions to exhibitions to corporate events with capacity of up to 2,500 people. Given that the QEII Centre is in the heart of London, steps away from Big Ben and Westminster Abbey, there’s already a lot of RF traffic in the space, which means the audio team there has a lot on its plate when it comes to ensuring its 38 wireless mics on site work as expected.
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(L-R): Joshua Wigley-Iles; Sound Tech Jack Randall
London, UK (December 2, 2015)—The Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre in London is a very busy place, hosting more than 400 national and international events a year, ranging from conventions to exhibitions to corporate events with capacity of up to 2,500 people. Given that the QEII Centre is in the heart of London, steps away from Big Ben and Westminster Abbey, there’s already a lot of RF traffic in the space, which means the audio team there has a lot on its plate when it comes to ensuring its 38 wireless mics on site work as expected.

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“All of our channels here at the conference centre are licensed, covering us from any interference with other equipment, but not all the time,” said sound engineer Joshua Wigley-Iles. “For example, we have had exhibitions where visiting wireless equipment would be used without any thought of frequency assignment or frequency coordination.”

As a result, the facility purchased a Kaltman Creations Invisible Waves RF-Vue about two years ago to help tackle RF issues. “It scans your desired frequency range and provides a simple view of what’s going on around you, said Wigley-Iles. “It’s also a tablet based kit, which is fantastic, as it’s easily transportable and the control surface is very user friendly. We can scan our frequency spectrum, see the offending frequencies, and then find and fix issues promptly.”

The unit, he said, aids in the detective work required to track down offending transmissions. “Touch-to-Listen…allows you to touch the frequency on the screen that you’re working on and listen in to what is being transmitted. Occasionally, we may get a rogue microphone on our channels and this feature allows us to track down the source and advise on the available licensed frequencies.”

The Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre

http://www.qeiicentre.london

Kaltman Creations
http://www.kaltmancreationsllc.com/