View From The Top: GORDON MOORE, PRESIDENT, LECTROSONICS

Founded in 1971, Lectrosonics has its roots in the AV industry (the Lectrosonics name deriving from the active lecterns that were among the company’s early products), though the company is better known currently for its wireless microphone systems and audio processing equipment, with a well-earned reputation for quality products and solid customer support across the broadcast, music, film and theater market segments.
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RIO RANCHO, NM—Founded in 1971, Lectrosonics has its roots in the AV industry (the Lectrosonics name deriving from the active lecterns that were among the company’s early products), though the company is better known currently for its wireless microphone systems and audio processing equipment, with a well-earned reputation for quality products and solid customer support across the broadcast, music, film and theater market segments.


Gordon Moore 27 years ago, Gordon Moore joined the still-young Lectrosonics, migrating from the catalog showroom industry. “I was not making use of my Bachelor of Science degree from New Mexico Tech,” recalls Moore. “After 13 years, I wanted to strike out and do something different. I started a computer business, but I soon saw the writing on the wall that computers were becoming a commodity product.” Moore says he “lucked into an interview with Lectrosonics,” and was hired as employee number 32, beginning in telemarketing sales. After a year and a half, he was named sales manager for the then-three person sales team. His responsibilities grew with the company, and he became VP of Sales in 1993, a position he held until being named company president in June of this year, taking charge after the retirement of longtime company president Larry Fisher.

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“My background in both science and sales has had tremendous influence on my career,” says Moore. “My interest in science and technology led me to a technology-focused university, where I received training across a variety of disciplines. That gave me my tech chops. My sales experience began when I took the job of selling cameras for the catalog company. That was valuable experience in the retail side of things, and it really helped me move to the manufacturing side. When I arrived at Lectrosonics, I already had 13 years of sales experience. Those things carried me here.”

At Lectrosonics, Moore dove in, learning more about audio with a passion. “As a telephone salesperson,” he shares. “I did not want to have to take any phone calls where someone had a technical question that I could not answer, so I bought every book I could find on audio, read it, went to industry events and took a total immersion approach.”

His self-education led to teaching and training, beginning after he attended the 1990 InfoComm. “I attended a seminar that was not as good as I’d hoped it would be, and the presenter was not really prepared and presented some inaccurate information. Later on, I bumped into the guy who was in charge of classes and told him what I thought was wrong. And I told him that I thought I could do better. A few weeks later, he called me and said, ‘Ok, hotshot, I need to teach a class in Minnesota next month and I want you to do a session on audio gain.’ I have been teaching for them ever since, and am now chairman of the education committee for InfoComm.” Teaching, says Moore, facilitated his own knowledge base: “If you have to teach it, then you have to learn it!”

Lectrosonics is a privately held company with 162 employees. “We are a single-campus company with two buildings and we do everything here in-house,” says Moore, “as quality control of our products to benefit the customer is of the utmost importance to us. We are a vertically oriented company; we do everything in terms of manufacturing—surface mount, machine shop, assembly, laser engraving, metal work and more, here onsite. We do all of our own R&D and engineering here, as well as all of our warranty and non-warranty service. The only things that we do outside are those things that have special EPA requirements.”

Lectrosonics has four regional offices in North America—in New York, Tennessee, Salt Lake City and a sales and service office in Toronto. Two outside rep companies support Lectrosonics’ international sales efforts: More Technologies for the Asia/Pacific region and The Bakery in Paris, led by Jim Bakker, which does all of Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

With a public-facing corporate motto of “Built To Last,” Lectrosonics has had a consistent company philosophy, says Moore, that is “what was told to me the first day I was hired, and what I have told every employee we have hired ever since. These three rules are: 1) We always strive build the best product we know how to; 2) we don’t sell directly to the government as the sales cycle is somewhat unstable; and 3) have fun at your job.” Initially, Moore says his “doubtful response was, ‘Huh? Yeah, sure.’ But the truth is, here I am at Lectrosonics 27 years later and I am still having fun. This is the culture in which we guide our employees. We want to make great products always and we want everyone to enjoy their work. We are an engineering-driven company and we want to remain that way. We are going to continue to engineer solutions that have a long-term ROI for the buyer. We have many clients who have had Lectrosonics products for 20 years that they are still using. And we are proud of that.”

Lectrosonics’ core market is in motion picture and television production, and electronic news gathering, Moore reveals. “We are also making our presence known in the live sound, theatrical and HOW markets, where we see our potential for growth.” Worldwide, Moore says that Lectrosonics has expanded its presence considerably throughout Asia in the past several years. Additionally, “We also have a stronger presence in Latin America in recent years. Finally, we have a considerable presence in Europe now, particularly in the UK film market.”

Moore views competition as healthy. “When a competitor comes up with an innovative idea, it gets us thinking in new ways. In the audio industry, we have the nicest bunch of people to be in competition with. It’s not uncommon for us to get together and talk after a show. Are we out to dominate each other? Of course we are. It is personal? No way. It’s a friendly rivalry.”

Innovation is evident in Lectrosonics’ product offerings, with its Digital Hybrid Wireless and encrypted digital wireless technologies, DSP prowess and its significant strides in product miniaturization being impressive examples. Asked whether any particular new initiatives are in the works, Moore simply replied, “Yes” (with a grin, absolute certainty and no elaboration).

As he begins a new chapter at Lectrosonics, Moore states, “I am fortunate in having the opportunity to take the helm at an excellent company. We have a marvelous engineering department, innovative R&D people, a great sales crew and innovative marketing team. This makes things easy for me. I have been fortunate to work with people here in an empowering environment. As the new president of the company, it’s like I have been handed the driver’s manual to a really well-oiled machine and given an open road to drive forward.”

Lectrosonics
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