Wide Hive Gets Wider

Producer, engineer and musician Gregory Howe has added another 16-channel expander to create a 48-channel API 1608 at his Wide Hive Studios in San Francisco’s Bay Area.
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Albany, CA (September 26, 2014)—Producer, engineer and musician Gregory Howe has added another 16-channel expander to create a 48-channel API 1608 at his Wide Hive Studios in San Francisco’s Bay Area.

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Wide Hive reopened its doors earlier this year after a number of recent renovations and updates. A decade ago, Howe folded his costly studio in San Francisco for a cozy, less expensive space in nearby Albany, CA. He centered his Albany studio around a 16-channel API 1608, which he later expanded to 32 channels through a 16-channel expander.

“I’ve been working with API gear for a long, long time,” Howe said. “I love the API sound. To me, it walks the perfect line between cleanliness, straight-up rock, and audiophile fidelity.”

The recently-expanded 48-channel 1608 unifies the studio’s sound, streamlines its workflow, and also allows clients to tap into Howe’s massive collection of outboard gear. “The new 16 channels primarily serve as returns from the equipment racks. We now have the flexibility and sound to do whatever we want.”

Wide Hive books jazz, funk, hip-hop and soul artists exclusively. Since the console’s expansion, Howe has used it to record several tracks. Of note, swing jazz guitarist Calvin Keys cut Electric Keys with the help of the 1608 and the Wide Hive Players, an in-house collective group of jazz musicians.

Howe’s commitment to recording is not lost on his listeners. “I’m a huge believer in analog summing,” he shares. “Digital summing involves a massive calculation that necessitates sacrifices. I can hear those sacrifices in the music. I’m looking forward to the cohesion we’ll have when the whole console is API.”

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