Phoenix Audio Bows N90-DRC/500 Compressor

Phoenix Audio has introduced the N90-DRC/500 compressor, also known as the David Rees Compressor, which is an API 500 series format compressor and gate that pairs with the DRS1R/500 mic pre amp and the new DRS-EQ/500 4 band EQ.
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New York, NY (October 18, 2012)—Phoenix Audio has introduced the N90-DRC/500 compressor, also known as the David Rees Compressor, which is an API 500 series format compressor and gate that pairs with the DRS1R/500 mic pre amp and the new DRS-EQ/500 4 band EQ.

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The new product will be on display at the Phoenix Audio booth (621) and the Vintage King booth (1111) at the 133rd AES Convention in San Francisco this month.

The Phoenix N90-DRC/500 compressor/gate is designed around a VCA control with Class A discrete input and Class A transformer balanced output. The N90-DRC/500 is intended to be driven ‘by ear.’ There are no optimum settings that would cover all situations. It is intended to be very musical and smooth; according to the company, musically the progressive curves ensure there is no sudden change on passing the threshold. Technically, the progressive curves are achieved using linear detection combined with logarithmic attenuation inside a closed control loop. "Limiter sound" is still provided by the higher ratios and there is a choice of attack times. The gate is more conventional but its release time is composite with a hold time followed by a fade time.

This product was originally conceived 20 years ago by David Rees but was never fully released. Shaun Leveque (Phoenix lead designer) and Rees worked to port this across for the API 'lunchbox' series.

Over David Rees' long career as an audio designer, he has designed for various companies such as Cadac, Tweed Audio, Shep Associates, to name just a few, as well as being heavily involved in Cathedral audio sound system designs such as the system installed in Winchester cathedral. Rees was also the Technical manager at the Rupert Neve company in the 1960’s and 70’s where he was solely responsible for the Neve 2254 and 2253 compressor, as well as having considerable input into many other well-known products.

Phoenix Audio
www.phoenixaudio.net