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Review: Nyrius ARIES Pro Wireless HDMI Transmitter and Receiver - ProSoundNetwork.com
The PSN review team takes on a HDMI wireless connection kit that allows audio and/or video content to be shared wirelessly from a HDMI port-equipped device.

In our increasingly collaborative, multimedia-dependent environments—especially in houses-of-worship (HOWs), educational, institutional and corporate worlds—connected communications are both expected and regularly troublesome on a daily basis. As such, the tiny Nyrius ARIES Pro Wireless HDMI Transmitter and Receiver is a must-have tool for nearly every A/V professional.

Why? Besides being small and relatively affordable, this $399 list/$249 street HDMI wireless connection kit allows anyone with audio and/or video content to be shared from a HDMI port-equipped device to do so wirelessly. From the youth group volunteer’s homemade slideshow that needs display to the congregation; to the late-arriving, sweating, personal device-dependent presenter who has to share information in less than 10 minutes (and counting) at corporate HQ; to the tech-challenged educator who brought just the perfect video on a Chromebook to show 400 children in the auditorium while their peers are testing, the Nyrius ARIES Pro is essentially a Godsend. And, yes—it’s a great living room YouTube-to-big screen solution, too. After using the Nyrius ARIES Pro kit for several months now, I plan to keep it in my small audio tool bag at all times.

Nyrius itself promotes the ARIES Pro akin to “an invisible HDMI cable,” yet when paired with an iOS-ready Lightning Digital AV Adapter, it allows a savvy A/V tech to be ready for nearly any presentation device that arrives on the scene. I tested it with the aforementioned Asus Chromebook, Mac Book Pro, iPad (via appropriate Lightning adapter), Windows laptop, random Android tablet with HDMI, and more. Together, each comprised solution was far easier to create than most every legacy/non-HDMI projection system I have come across at schools, churches and other institutions. Most of those are so outdated that they mainly create headaches and frustrations, while most presenters today arrive on the scene with just the right content on their own device. And, in fact, it is our jobs to get that content to the presentation screen.

The ARIES Pro’s latency is inconsequential, and its claimed operational range—up to 100 feet of streaming, line-of-sight—proved to be accurate in my usage. This allows presenters to place their devices nearly anywhere, or to allow an A/V person to take care of the content from anywhere in most any room.

Best of all, and as you might glean by this point in the review, I was unable to find any real problems in using the ARIES Pro. Paired with a Mac Book Pro, the positioning of the HDMI port partially covered the adjacent USB port, which is required to bus-power the transmitter; luckily that particular CPU provides another USB port elsewhere, but just in case, it might be good to have another cable solution on hand (a USB extension, etc.) Other than the uses listed here, Nyrius customers are using the ARIES Pro to share more device-based content on their large HDTVs, gaming, streaming video from UAV drones and HDSLRs and more. I fully recommend the ARIES Pro for most every HOW, school or institution for the applications shared above as well as all the others that you may discover.