Selected Audio Clips JZ Vintage Series LDC Microphones - ProSoundNetwork.com

Selected Audio Clips JZ Vintage Series LDC Microphones

The full JZ Vintage Series microphone review appears in the April 2011 issue of Pro Audio Review, available in print and digital editions, plus available on our website. We hope you find the following audio files both informative and further
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The full JZ Vintage Series microphone review appears in the April 2011 issue of Pro Audio Review, available in print and digital editions, plus available on our website. We hope you find the following audio files both informative and further illustrative of the conclusions made by our contributor. - Ed.

PAR Contributor Rob Tavaglione: With singer/songwriter Perry Fowler in for a session, I attempted some trustworthy comparisons with the V47/V67, and their inspirations. Perry played his acoustic with the Neumann and JZ ‘67s aimed at his guitar’s lower body, then the ‘47s aimed at the neck/body juncture, all four microphones about one foot away from the instrument and each pair as close to coincident as possible. I made sure they were aligned closely on the more “placement sensitive” horizontal access and sharing the sweet spot on the vertical axis."

Audio clips #1A and #1B: "In clips 1A and 1B, some minute differences between the Neumann U47 (1A) and the JZ V47 (1B) can be heard; the V47 was approximately 15 dB hotter than the U47, but I’ve level matched (using both preamp gain and gain in my DAW). The JZ appears to have nearly captured the robust bottom end of the original, matched the stylish mids and ever so slightly brightened up the classic high end of the original. Maybe the V47 is just a touch brighter in relation to the U47’s old age, but the two were much closer in performance than I ever expected; in my opinion, they are so close it could be said, 'Yes, that’s a ‘47 on acoustic guitar' — sonically, at least."

Audio clips #2A and #2B: "In clips 2A and 2B, the more substantial difference between the Neumann U67 (#2A) and the JZ V67 (#2B) is apparent. The V67 appears to have reasonably duplicated the leaner bottom and forward mids of the U67, but puts out a good bit more high end and a slightly tighter bottom. While the V67’s top is similar in character, it is more extended and abundant. The V67 was approximately 20 dB hotter than the U67 (and again, I used both preamp gain and my DAW to level match the two)."