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Sound Guy Divulges Dereverberationizer

Dereverberationizer, a software application intended for removing excess reverb from musical performances, has enabled scientists to listen to the sound of the Big Bang at the dawn of time.

Today, a number of pro audio manufacturers contacted us about new products that, frankly, left us incredulous. Rather than edit down their product announcements into our trademark, even-handed distillations that are free from marketing hype, today we’re making a rare exception and running these announcements ‘as-is’ so that you, our readers, can fully assess these unique products for yourselves, just as the manufacturers intended.

San Jose, CA (April 1, 2014)—Dereverberationizer, a software application intended for removing excess reverb from musical performances, has enabled scientists to listen to the sound of the Big Bang at the dawn of time.

Published by The Sound Guy, Inc., Dereverberationizer removes any amount of reverberation, no matter how extreme. The program was originally designed for various common, everyday uses, such as removing excess reverb from lectures or concerts. However, CEO Earl Vickers stated, “We’re continually surprised by all the new ways people use the software. For example, in Switzerland, Dereverberationizer has helped improve the intelligibility of messages conveyed across the Alps via yodeling.”

Most significantly, as heard in the accompanying promotional video, scientists have recently used Dereverberationizer to listen to the sound of the Big Bang for the first time, free from the distortion that occurred as the cosmic background radiation reverberated throughout all of time and space. This discovery not only helps confirm the existence of gravitational waves, as predicted by Einstein’s theory of General Relativity, but it also provides direct, audible evidence of what happened in the first fraction of a second after the singularity.

The inspiration for Dereverberationizer was composer Alvin Lucier’s famous recording “I am sitting in a room,” in which Lucier recorded his narration of a text, then re-recorded successive generations of the tape over and over in the same room until the reverb turned his voice into an unintelligible wash of resonant tones. Vickers wondered whether it would be possible to recover the original voice from the final, unrecognizable sounds. After removing one generation of reverb at a time, the end result proved virtually identical to the original.

Dereverberationizer
www.audioeffects.com/dereverberationizer.htm

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