Andy Meyer and Paul Klimson oversee dozens of inputs at every stop on Timberlake’s world tour.

New York, NY (November 1, 2018)—Justin Timberlake has been on the road with his sixth world tour, Man Of The Woods, and along for every step of the journey have been FOH engineer Andy Meyer and monitor engineer Paul Klimson, using pro-audio gear provided by Clair Global (Lititz, PA).

FOH engineer Andy Meyer mixes Justin Timberlake’s current Man of the Woods tour from a perch in the stands

FOH engineer Andy Meyer mixes Justin Timberlake’s current Man of the Woods tour from a perch in the stands

Meyer has his hands full, overseeing a DiGiCo SD7 console receiving 200 input paths at FOH, with 138 outputs. “I’ve got snapshots for changes that I want to make, and I fire it all off of time code” using footswitches, he said. That doesn’t mean it’s a set-and-forget show; rather, the snapshots free him up to focus on what really matters: Timberlake’s vocal.

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“It’s level-wise that I’m doing the work in real-time,” he explained, discussing the star’s vocal: “You can't just leave that up—that's because everyone is everywhere, so I have to make changes around that. Every once in a while, you have that magic show that’s perfect, and you just laugh and go through the motions, but it’s pretty much always an adjustment situation.”

The FOH position on the tour is centered around a DiGiCo SD7 console.

The FOH position on the tour is centered around a DiGiCo SD7 console.

Monitor engineer, Paul Klimson, has worked with Timberlake since the artist's 20/20 tour in 2013 and is still using and updating the showfile he began developing on that tour. “The SD7 is the only console to use when you’re talking big channel counts—and it really does come down to that,” he said. “There are two stage racks and a Nano rack, and I use all of the inputs, so we’re at 140 channels. I’m really excited to change over to DiGiCo’s new Quantum engine when it becomes available, and explore the new options and features that will aid us monitor engineers.”

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While Klimson describes mixing IEMs as “quite utilitarian because they have to hear everything,” he’s nonetheless rather busy at stageside, looking after 32 stereo monitor mixes between Timberlake, dancers and the band. “They are all playing together and vibing off of each other—we are very lucky working with these guys.”

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