Eventide Peeks Processor at AES Paris

Eventide came to the 140th AES Convention, held this past weekend in the City of Lights to demonstrate to select customers and distributors a new multichannel/multi-element signal-processing system aimed for the special effects and object-based rendering industry. Scheduled to be formally unveiled at the AES Convention in Los Angeles this coming October, the new as-yet-unnamed device is being targeted at the music-recording, film/TV post-production and live-performance communities.
Author:
Publish date:

Paris, France (June 8, 2016)—Eventide came to the 140th AES Convention, held this past weekend in the City of Lights to demonstrate to select customers and distributors a new multichannel/multi-element signal-processing system aimed for the special effects and object-based rendering industry. Scheduled to be formally unveiled at the AES Convention in Los Angeles this coming October, the new as-yet-unnamed device is being targeted at the music-recording, film/TV post-production and live-performance communities.

Utilizing a quartet of high-power ARM processors mounted on plug-in boards that allow subsequent updates when next-generation and/or faster DSP chips became available, the new system feature 32 inputs and 32 discrete outputs per DSP module, enabling up to four multichannel effects paths to be run simultaneously.

A custom graphical user interface will allow full integration with Avid Pro Tools and other current DAWs, or use from a stand-alone application. Eventide will also offer a version of the GUI that runs on an Apple iPad or PCs/Macintosh PCs via a Wi-Fi or USB connection, as well as fully-compatible AU, AAX and VST plug-ins.

“Initially, frequency- and time-domain effects will be draw from our existing H8000 and H9 processors—with other EQ, dynamics plus reverb effects in development—and can be run in parallel or series, to effectively create a fully-programmable, four-element channel strip per processing engine,” said software engineer Joe Bamberg.

While initial application for the processing system will be towards developing multi-element channel strips for music production—possibly one path dedicated to vocals, another to a piano track plus others for drum and guitar—the unit’s multi-channel I/O and multiple processing options are expected to enable object-based EQ, dynamic and ambience processing needed for immersive-sound production projects being undertaken within the motion-picture and TV-post community, in addition to multichannel sound playback for live performance, including acoustic enhancement systems.

End-user cost for the codenamed product, which will also feature Audinate Dante, Thunderbolt, Ravenna/AES67 and AVB networking, has yet to be determined.

Eventide
www.eventide.com