As the explosive hit comes to video, production sound mixer Chris Munro talks miking MI:6.

Los Angeles, CA (November 14, 2018)—Having raked in nearly $800 million at the box office this past summer, Mission: Impossible – Fallout heads to home video in early December, giving audiences another opportunity to hear—but not see—the audio work of production sound mixer Chris Munro.

Speeding cars, motorbike chases, skydives and jumps out of helicopters are all in a day’s work for Ethan Hunt, the main character played by Tom Cruise in the series. Mission: Impossible – Fallout was Munro’s second MI film and the sixth in the series.

Lectrosonics Skydives into M:I - Fallout

Munro mainly used DPA d:screet 4060 mics for dialogue and switched to d:screet 4061s when he needed to hide a small microphone in a vehicle. The mics were used during the film’s Paris car and motorbike chase scenes, for example—an instance where Munro opted to use them due to their ability to withstand high sound pressure levels.

“I have been using DPA mics for some years, and for most situations, they are my preferred lavalier or body-worn microphone,” said Munro. “For Fallout—or Mi:6 as we call it—the d:screet 4060 slim lavaliers were necessary because the film was shot in multiple formats including 35mm film, digital and IMAX. One of the effects of digital 4K and 8K resolution is absolute clarity and focus, even in low-light conditions. This presents a much greater challenge for hiding microphones so the smaller they are the better chance we have of getting them in a good position.”

On Mi:6, Munro also used DPA’s d:mension 5100 mobile surround microphone, a relative newcomer to his microphone arsenal. “I first used it on Wonder Woman to capture 5.1 ambience,” he says. “By using it with a Zoom F8, I get a very compact and convenient package that allows me to constantly record ambience in 5.1 surround.

Want more information like this? Subscribe to our newsletter and get it delivered right to your inbox.

“On Mi:6, I mounted the 5100 inside cars and inside helicopters. Its practical shape and small footprint meant I could mount it on the inside roof of a helicopter where it looked like part of the helicopter and not a microphone, even if a camera caught a glimpse of it.”

DPA Microphones • www.dpamicrophones.com