Technicolor Posts Soundbreaking - ProSoundNetwork.com

Technicolor Posts Soundbreaking

Technicolor PostWorks New York recently post-produced picture and sound for the new eight-part PBS documentary, Soundbreaking: Stories from the Cutting Edge of Recorded Music.
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New York, NY (November 23, 2016)—Technicolor PostWorks New York recently post-produced picture and sound for the new eight-part PBS documentary, Soundbreaking: Stories from the Cutting Edge of Recorded Music.

Produced by Show of Force and directed by Maro Chermayeff and Jeff Dupre, the series reaches back to the 1920s, when music was first committed to vinyl, but focuses on the period from the 1960s to the present.

Re-recording mixers Martin Czembor and Paul Furedi faced challenges in bringing consistency to the soundtrack. “We might have a Madonna track from the ‘80s,” notes Czembor. “If you listened to it when it was originally recorded, you got a full experience, but, now, if we set it next to a Kanye West track, it can sound lacking because sonically so much has changed. Our role was to bring sounds from different eras together in a way that is smooth and coherent in order to show how they connect.”

In the soundtrack, elements are often woven together to illustrate the creative process. “There is a section where George Martin’s son is talking about how some of the Beatles’ songs were built, and he throws up a few faders so that you can hear how the parts come together,” Czembor says. “We go from the individual tracks and build into the whole song. It’s fascinating.

“We do a similar thing with Adele’s producer to show what she does with a song. We blend material from the recording studio, cinema verite scenes and the finished song. Those sequences are powerful because they get more across than you could possibly do with words and music alone.”

One of Czembor’s favorite sequences in the series involved Frank Sinatra and his groundbreaking microphone technique. “It weaves between interviews describing the uniqueness of his approach with Sinatra singing a love song,” Czembor recalls.

Technicolor PostWorks New York
www.technicolorpwny.com