Homemade Star Wars Movie Lands at Skywalker Sound

If you’ve spent any time poking around You Tube, you’ve probably come across a Fan Film or two—those homemade, amateur movies that pay tribute to famous movie franchises like Batman or Star Trek. One of the most famous fan flicks of all-time is Pink Five, a comedic Star Wars short that basically asks, “What if a Valley Girl flew in that famous Rebel raid on the Death Star?” It’s not just fans who like it—George Lucas himself chose it as his favorite fan production one year, for his annual Star Wars Fan Film Awards. The result was that filmmaker Trey Stokes’ home-spun, $200 movie was professionally remixed at Lucas' own Skywalker Sound—a tale Stokes recounts in this clip from the documentary, Backyard Blockbusters.
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If you’ve spent any time poking around You Tube, you’ve probably come across a Fan Film or two—those homemade, amateur movies that pay tribute to famous movie franchises like Batman or Star Trek. One of the most famous Fan Films of all-time is Pink Five, a comedic Star Wars short that basically asks, “What if a Valley Girl flew in that famous Rebel raid on the Death Star?” It’s not just fans who like it—George Lucas himself chose it as his favorite fan production one year, for his annual Star Wars Fan Film Awards. The result was that filmmaker Trey Stokes’ home-spun, $200 movie was professionally remixed at Lucas' own Skywalker Sound—a tale Stokes recounts here in this clip from the documentary, Backyard Blockbusters.

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Pink Five became such an online hit that it garnered millions of views, causing the folks at Lucasfilm to gently nudge Stokes and his crew to make a sequel, Pink Five Strikes Back. That clever follow-up, in turn, won an Audience Choice Award at the Star Wars Fan Film Awards the following year. Buoyed by its success, Stokes and his gang went for the brass ring and created a massive, three-part finale, Return of Pink Five. But while the first two parts of Return were completed, Stokes ultimately had to leave the final chapter of the Pink Five saga unfinished, due to budget constraints and the need to actually go out and make a living.

Now Stokes has started a Kickstarter campaign to raise the funds needed to finally finish off the tale—namely money for ADR, hard-drive recovery, special effects and more. [BLOG UPDATE, SEPT. 2012: Stokes' campaign raised 140% of the money needed to complete Pink Five ($28,000); at this writing, he is planning to use the extra $8,000 to create a small prequel as well, all of which he plans to debut in early 2013.]

If you haven’t seen Pink Five before, get ready to lose the next half-hour to chuckling over the exploits of Stacey, Yoda and Obi-Wan as they muck around in the background of the famous sci-fi trilogy. These are fun, professional-grade flicks, which is all the more impressive when you consider Stokes was working with essentially no budget, just the help of enthusiastic volunteers.