Karmin Performance Pops For Casio

Sound reinforcement is critical for any corporate event, but when the client is launching a new line of musical instruments, the stakes are even higher. That was the situation on Tuesday, September 11, at New York City’s Edison Ballroom, just off Times Square, when MI giant Casio held its Beyond Sound II event to unveil a new line of Privia digital pianos. Adding to the evening were performances by Tom Brislin, Enferno and pop duo Karmin, currently riding the charts with the Billboard Top 20 hit, “Brokenhearted.”
Author:
Publish date:
Image placeholder title

Pop duo Karmin performs at Casio's Privia piano launch.

Sound reinforcement is critical for any corporate event, but when the client is launching a new line of musical instruments, the stakes are even higher. That was the situation on Tuesday, September 11, at New York City’s Edison Ballroom (edisonballroom.com), just off Times Square, when MI giant Casio (casio.com) held its Beyond Sound II event to unveil a new line of Privia digital pianos. Adding to the evening were performances by Tom Brislin, Enferno and pop duo Karmin, currently riding the charts with the Billboard Top 20 hit, “Brokenhearted.”

Making sure it all came off without a hitch was New York City-based company Trio Audio Inc. (trioaudio.com), providing the sound reinforcement for a presentation by Casio’s director of Marketing Mike Martin and the three acts. Also on hand were PX-850, PX-750, PX-350 and PX-150 pianos for attendees to try out.

Image placeholder title

In-house engineer Shawn Brophy said a number of JBL VRX loudspeakers are positioned along the edges of the main dance floor, providing sound to guests from every corner of the room. Trio Audio, co-owned by Brophy and partners Sam Yee and Efrain Chiclana, has provided sound reinforcement services for a number of nightclubs in the city; that experience, Brophy said, helps the company provide clear sound during all performances at the Edison Ballroom. “After being in the business for 20 years, I always choose JBL because it has its own components and cabinets. It’s usually the company that works best,” Brophy said.

The JBL system was powered by Crown I-Tech amplifiers, and Brophy mixed the show on a Yamaha LS9 console. Musicians used a variety of microphones, including AKG 451s, Shure SM57s and SLX wireless mics.