Building A Treehouse Recording Studio

We hear stories all the time about studios creating a new atmosphere for its clients, like decorating the interior to look like a log cabin, or setting the studio next to the beach. Recently, Pro Sound News stumbled upon a story of a recording studio built in a tree.
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Bear Creek Studio's latest studio room, 18 feet off the ground in a custom treehouse. Photo: Inhabitat.com

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We hear stories all the time about studios creating a new atmosphere for its clients, like decorating the interior to look like a log cabin, or setting the studio next to the beach. Recently, Pro Sound News stumbled upon a story of a recording studio built in a tree.

Nestled in the rustic Washington forests outside of Seattle is Bear Creek Studio, a barn-turned-recording studio with two large live rooms, three iso booths, and Trident TSM and Neve BCM consoles on-hand. Recently, Animal Planet’s popular show, Treehouse Masters, came to Bear Creek and built a studio in a new treehouse, 18 feet off the ground.

The show, set to air on February 21, will show the building process of the treehouse, and owner Joe Hadlock’s first impressions of the studio, which includes a composting toilet as part of the facility’s many sustainable features. It also features a guest appearance by CeeLo Green, who became the first artist to record in the new space.

Established in 1977 on a 10-acre farm in Woodinville, WA, Bear Creek Studio has hosted a number of artists over the years, including Brandi Carlile, The Lumineers, Soundgarden, Foo Fighters and James Brown.