Recording Naval Combat at Home

Man o’War: Corsair, a new oceanic warfare videogame set in the Warhammer world, may have epic scope, but its audio was created in a home studio that its owner, Matthew Kilford, describes as “simple and small.”
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Swindon, UK (May 10, 2016)—Man o’War: Corsair, a new oceanic warfare videogame set in the Warhammer world, may have epic scope, but its audio was created in a home studio that its owner, Matthew Kilford, describes as “simple and small.”

As such, some of the more complicated sound effects need to be sourced from Foley studios. “I don't have access to historical weapons,” said Kilford, but it takes creativity to design of some of the more obscure sound effects. “The sound of the ship moving in the game is actually a windmill, and if my memory serves me correctly, I pitched it and made it into a few loops.”

He records all the voiceovers in his studio, “apart from a few bits on location where we were essentially shouting in a field,” he said. “I’ve been using a Shure SM7B mic for most of the voiceover work. The mic pres on the Audient iD22 are clean and quiet to my ears, even when cranking the gain all the way up to 60 dB, and that’s plenty enough gain for me as I record quite conservatively.

He has recently added the Audient iD22 interface to his set up, ahead of a planned move to a more purpose built studio. “I’m surprised how much it’s helped,” said Kilford. “My previous audio interface had been giving me trouble for the last year and I’ve never been one to chop and change easily—so I looked at every interface on the market! With the iD22, it's great to have everything situated on the unit, and there’s no breakout cable; this was a massive plus for me. The software has yet to give me any problem, which has also been a breath of fresh air.

“The mic pres also have a lovely mid-range ‘bark’ to them which I’m really liking, and the headphone amp drive has plenty of gain to drive my Sennheiser 650s. Most importantly though, I mix quite quietly in mono, switching between headphones and monitors. Having separate physical volume controls has been fantastically helpful.”

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